African-American women journalists and their male editors: A tradition of support

Title: African-American women journalists and their male editors: A tradition of support

Year: 1993

Journal / Publication: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly

Volume: 70

Issue: 2

Pages: 276 – 286

Authors: Streitmatter, Rodger

Abstract:

Black women journalists have not been hampered by the sexist attitudes of men to the same degree that white women journalists have been. Since this theme was introduced a century ago, individual case studies have continued to reinforce it. Gertrude Bustill Mossell, Delilah Beasley and Ida B. Wells were nineteenth-century women whose journalistic success was supported by their male editors; Marvel Cooke, Lucile Bluford and Ethel Payne have enjoyed similar relationships in the twentieth century. Factors contributing to this tendency are that African-American women have a tradition of working outside the home, that African-American editors historically have been both journalists and racial activists, and that male editors have tended to treat African-American women journalists much as fathers treat their daughters.

Link: http://jmq.sagepub.com/content/70/2/276.abstract

Keywords: N/A